Comments and other PDF mark-up

Working with an annotated PDF

The PDF has been returned by the proofreader and the file is covered in comments and pop-up boxes. What is the next step?

Some of the comments are queries that need to be addressed before amending the originating document. Others are corrections that need to be implemented. Some of the points raised by the proofreader need to be looked at by more than one person before finalizing the document.

See Working with Adobe Reader – Tools, Marking up with Drawing Markups, and Marking up with Annotations to review the various tools the proofreader will have had access to when working with Acrobat or Adobe Reader.

Taming the view

Whether the PDF shows a welter of pop-up notes obscuring the text (and each other) or not will depend upon various default settings and behaviours. The behaviour of the pop-up notes and the Comments List is controlled by the options selected in the Preferences dialog box (Edit menu → Preferences → Commenting; Figure 1).

The Commenting options available in Acrobat's Preferences

Figure 1. The Commenting options available in Acrobat’s Preferences.

 

Accepting or deleting comments

There are several methods to do this. The one you chose will depend on what works for you and on how many other people may need to work on the same file after you.

The simplest method of accepting or deleting an annotation is probably to select the annotation or mark-up, and then right clicking. This will bring up a context menu with several options, one of which is ‘delete’. This method works when the Comments List is closed (Figure 2) and when the Comments List is open (Figure 3).

The context menu for a selected text annotation (Comments list off)

Figure 2. The context menu for a selected text annotation (Comments List off).

Note: 1=Comment button; 2=selected comment’s pop-up context menu.

The context menu for a selected text annotation (Comments list on)

Figure 3. The context menu for a selected text annotation (Comments List on).

Note: 1=Comment button; 2=selected annotation’s pop-up context menu; 3=content of the selected annotation’s pop-up note in the Comments List.

Alternatively, with the Comments List open, you can select a text annotation or mark-up and right-click to bring up another context menu: the options include reply, delete, and set status. If you chose set status, a sub-menu appears with a list of options including ‘Accepted’ and ‘Cancelled’ (Figure 4).

The Comments List and the context menu for a selected text annotation in a marked-up PDF.

Figure 4. The Comments List and the context menu for a selected text annotation in a marked-up PDF.

Note: 1=Comment button; 2=selected annotation is highlighted in the text; 3=selected annotation highlighted in the Comments List with context menu.

Please note: The images used in this post include Adobe product screenshot(s) reprinted with permission from Adobe Systems Incorporated.

Copyright Harmonisation in the EU

I have just been informed of an EU symposium that will take place on 3 April 2013 to look at copyright in the EU.
More information about the event is available from the Public Policy Exchange website (http://publicpolicyexchange.co.uk/events/DD03-PPE2.php).

Keyboard Shortcuts

I have a set of keyboard shortcuts that I routinely use in Word. It’s a fairly short list, because I have to 1) remember that a shortcut is available; 2) remember the shortcut itself; and 3) remember to use the shortcut!
Recently I found myself repeating the same actions over and over again, so I decided it was time to teach myself another shortcut.

Rather than reinvent the wheel, I checked the list of keyboard shortcuts that are available in Word to see if the action I wanted to do already had a shortcut assigned to it. It did, so now all I have to do is remember to use it.

Where did I find the list of pre-programmed shortcuts?
In Word’s help section, search for ‘keyboard shortcuts’ and an article about ‘Keyboard Shortcuts for Word’ should appear at the top of the list of possible solutions.

You can find the list of keyboard shortcuts for other Office programs by searching the help files from within the relevant program.

What if the action I want to perform doesn’t have an existing shortcut?
I add a new shortcut.

How?
To add a new shortcut to Word 2010 (or any other Office program):
1. From the Word options dialogue box, click Customize Ribbon.
2. The Customize the Ribbon and keyboard shortcuts options appear.
3. Click on the ‘Customize’ button to the left of Keyboard Shortcuts at the bottom of the Dialogue box.

Customize Ribbon and keyboard shortcuts

The Customize the Ribbon and keyboard shortcuts options


A Customize Keyboard dialogue box appears.
You now need to specify the command you want to add a keyboard shortcut to.
4. In the Categories box, highlight the name of the tab with which the command is associated.
5. Then highlight the command in the Commands box.
6. If any shortcuts are already associated with the command, they will be displayed in the Current keys section.

Word's Customize Keyboard dialogue box

Word’s Customize Keyboard dialogue box


7. If no shortcuts are associated with the command the Current Keys section will be blank.
8. Place the cursor in the Press new shortcut key box and press the keys you wish to use for the shortcut.
9. The new key assignments will cause a message to appear below the current keys box stating whether your chosen combination is currently unassigned to any other shortcut or if it matches the shortcut currently used by a different command.
10. Once you are happy with the key combination, click the ‘Assign’ button to confirm the new shortcut.

Word's Customize Keyboard dialogue box

Word’s Customize Keyboard dialogue box

Adobe Reader XI

The latest version of Adobe Reader, Adobe Reader XI, allows users to use the full range of commenting mark-up tools available in Adobe Acrobat Pro (and to enabled PDFs in Adobe Reader X) without the originator of the PDF needing to enable the PDF file beforehand.

This means that if you wish to use drawings mark-ups, for example,  in Adobe Reader XI you don’t need to check if the PDF has been enabled before you start work.

Marking up with Annotations

If the Drawing Markups, as described in another post (Drawing mark-ups in Adobe Reader), allow the proofreader or copy-editor to mark-up the digital document as they would a paper document , the Annotations  allow the proofreader to add the electronic equivalents of highlighter, stamps, and sticky notes to the PDF (Figures 1 & 2).

Inserting or substituting text or deleting individual letters or words

  • Select the text, click the appropriate text edit from the Annotations menu and type in the pop-up box as needed.

Deleting text

  • Place cursor at text to be deleted and use the delete or backspace button on your keyboard.

Using the Highlighter

  • Select the text and then click on the highlighter or select the highlighter and click on the text. Both ways work.
  • The highlighter can disable the pop-ups of the text edits, so be careful if using the highlighter and text edits in the same section.

 

Annotations in Adobe Reader

Figure 1. Insert, delete, highlight and underline with Annotations in Adobe Reader

Using Stamps

  • Select the stamp you want to use.
  • Position it where it needs to go.
  • It is possible to create new stamps or import stamps created by others.

Adding notes

You have the choice of adding Sticky Notes or Adding a note to text.

  • Sticky Notes: this adds a speech bubble icon to the text and opens up a pop-up box in which to type your comment.
  • Add note to text: this highlights the selected text ands opens up a pop-up box for your comment. Once you have typed your comment, the text highlight has small speech bubble added to the top-left corner.

 

More Annotations in Adobe Reader

Figure 2. Adding stamps and notes with the Annotations menu in Adobe Reader

 

Please note: The image(s) used in this post include Adobe product screenshot(s) reprinted with permission from Adobe Systems Incorporated.